Physics

Timeline Physics (continued)


  • 1648 The Italian Evangelista Torricelli invents a mercury barometer that would later bear his name.
  • 1657 - Robert Hooke proves Galileo's theory that all bodies fall at the same speed in a vacuum.
  • 1662 - Robert Boyle demonstrates that air can be compressed by formulating the law that relates volume and pressure of a gas, which would be renamed Boyle's Law.
  • 1665 - Isaac Newton makes the first assumptions about gravitation, according to beliefs, after being hit by an apple.
  • 1666 - Isaac Newton discovers the spectrum of white light, concluding that white light is actually the composition of all the colors of the spectrum that are the colors of the rainbow.
  • 1676 - Olaus Römer proposes that light has a finite speed.
  • 1678 Christiaan Huygens defends the idea that light propagates as a wave. But it cannot demonstrate in practice what it claims. It also discovers the polarization of light.
  • 1687 - Isaac Newton publishes the book Principia, which presents the three laws governing classical physics and the law of universal gravitation.
  • 1690 Christiaan Huygens formulates the wave theory of light.
  • 1738 - Daniel Bernoulli hypothesizes that gases are composed of an infinity of tiny particles, always in motion. And that the temperature of a gas reflects the velocity of these particles. It also publishes studies on fluid pressure and velocity.
  • 1752 Benjamin Franklin publishes the result of his observations on lightning, proposing that there are two types of electric charge, positive and negative. It also proposes the law of attraction and repulsion of charges according to its sign.
  • 1785 - Charles Augustin Coulomb enunciates the law of electrostatic forces.
  • 1800 - William Herschel discovers that the sun emits, besides light, another type of ray: infrared rays.
  • 1801 - Thomas Young demonstrates that light is, or can behave like a wave.
  • 1801 - Carl Ritter discovers ultraviolet radiation.
  • 1820 - Hans Oersted approaches a compass to an electrified wire, showing that electric current could move the compass pointer giving a practical demonstration that electrical and magnetic forces have common properties.
  • 1820 - André-Marie Ampère formulates laws of electrodynamics.
  • 1821 - Michael Faraday proposes the fundamentals of electromagnetic induction.
  • 1824 - Nicolas-Leonard-Sadi Carnot initiates thermodynamics in an attempt to evaluate and increase the efficiency of steam engines.
  • 1827 - Georg Simon Ohm formulates the law that relates potential, resistance and electric current.
  • 1831 - Michael Faraday proposes electromagnetic induction.
  • 1831 James Maxwell describes light as an electromagnetic wave.
  • 1839 Antoine Becquerel discovers a device that can capture light energy, the photovoltaic cell.
  • 1842 - Christian Doppler lays the foundation for the Doppler effect.
  • 1843 - James Prescott Joule builds a machine capable of measuring the mechanical equivalence of heat, thereby determining the amount of mechanical work required to produce a heat unit.
  • 1847 - Joule's experience makes possible the affirmation of the so-called Energy Conservation Law, or First Law of Thermodynamics. Defined by Hermann Ludwig Ferdinand von Helmholtz.
  • 1848 - William Thomson, Lord Kelvin, notes that body temperatures cannot go down indefinitely. Reaching a limit from which it no longer falls, called absolute zero.