Chemistry

Molecular geometry


Molecular geometry explains how atoms are arranged within the molecule.

Atoms tend to be as spaced and scattered as possible. Thus, they can acquire stability.

Molecular geometries are: linear, angular, planar trigonal, pyramidal, tetrahedral, octahedral, T-shape, trigonal bipyram, distorted tetrahedral or seesaw, planar square and quadratic base pyramid.

See the main molecular geometries below.

Example:

For diatomic molecules (with two atoms)

Polar - Different Atoms: HCl H - Cl
Apolar - equal atoms: H2 H - H

For triatomic molecules (with three atoms)

No leftover electrons from the central element. Nonpolar.

They form an angle of 180 °.

CS2 S - C - S

For triatomic molecules with leftover electrons. Polar.

They form an angle of 109 ° 28 '.

For tetratomic molecules without electron leftovers. Nonpolar.

For tetratomic molecules, left over from a pair of electrons. Polar.

     

For pentatomic molecules with central atom. Nonpolar.